Page 0141

squaremeal.co.uk | 139

LUXURY

SPECIAL

a red-leather interior, as well as a leatherbound

book signed by the distillery manager.

Tasting notes: Dry fruit and „ oral notes

emerge for a lasting   nish.

£2,850, Harrods

Buying anything from a mothballed

distillery guarantees it's going to be both

rare and expensive. It's also a pretty

special thing to have; there will

never be anything like it again. The

Lost Distilleries Blend #6 takes

this idea a step further because it's a blend

of malts from 'lost' distillieries including

Mosstowie, Port Ellen, Glenisla, Imperial,

Caperdonich, Glen Mhor and Brora, plus

grain whiskies from Port Dundas. There

are only 534 bottles available and it

weighs in at 49.3% abv.

Tasting notes: Green apple, honey and

grassy notes on the nose give way to

toŸ ee apple, nutmeg, cinnamon and

praline with a hint of smoke.

£349.95, Master of Malt

Tequila is matured in American and

French oak barrels for a minimum

of 12 months before being distilled

again and then racked in vintage

Bordeaux barrels. The amber nectar

comes in a crystal bottle with

a handcrafted box.

Tasting notes: Aromas of oak,

vanilla, raisins and light agave.

£432, thedrinkshop.com

Vodka

Although it doesn't boast

the ageing or rare-spirit

status of some whiskies and

Cognacs, no drinks cabinet is

complete without vodka.

For a serious luxury

proposition, try the Grey Goose

Gallon. OK, so you might have to put

this 4.5-litre bottle next to the drinks

cabinet, but it makes a real statement

when it comes to mixing Martinis.

Tasting notes: Distilled in France from

wheat, it has a clean nose with a hint

of citrus and a slight touch of almond

on the palate.

£517, The Whisky Exchange

Whisky

If you want to invest in a series, check out

The Macallan's 1824 Masters Series,

which includes The Macallan M. It's a

collaboration between three masters of their

craft: creative director Fabien Baron, Lalique

and The Macallan. The single malt shows

character from Spanish sherry-oak casks,

which are used in the maturation process.

Tasting notes: Vanilla and green apple go

hand in hand. Ginger, nutmeg and cinnamon

create a background, with notes of polished

oak, juicy oranges and

dried fruit to the fore.

£3,300, The Whisky

Exchange

There are only 500

bottles of Glengoyne

35 Year Old in existence,

making the contents of

this hand-blown, engraved

decanter a top drop for your

collection of liquid assets. At 46.8%

abv, the 35-year-old has a full nose, with

Glengoyne's signature apple at its core.

The dram comes in a solid oak box with

Under the hammer:

spirits to buy at auction

If you've still got money to burn after stocking up your drinks cabinet - or

if you fancy investing in the hard stuŸ - there's plenty of excitement to be

had at auction. A record number of collectable bottles of Scotch whisky were

sold at auction in the UK during 2014, according to whisky consultancy Rare

Whisky 101. The   rm says the number of single malts sold that year soared

by more than 68% to 33,998, resulting in a massive increase in the value of

collectable bottles, which now sits at £7.656m.

The Macallan recently scooped a Guinness World Record for the 'most

expensive whisky sold at auction'. The Macallan M Imperiale 6-litre Lalique

decanter sold at auction in Hong Kong for $628,000 (£411,000) in January

2014, breaking the previous record of $460,000, which had been held by The

Macallan 64-year-old in Lalique Cire Perdue decanter.

Rare Whisky 101 co-founder Andy Simpson oŸ ers words of wisdom when it

comes to whisky investment. 'Investing in whisky has certain advantages over

wine - it doesn't require the cool, cellar-like conditions that wines often demand.

Bottles must be stored upright but can be kept in almost any

environment. As a result, whisky can and should be kept

in pristine condition - its value can fall dramatically

if damage is done to the bottle or label or if the "  ll

level" drops, which indicates poor closing, resulting

in evaporation. Thankfully, however, unlike wine, there

is no evidence that whisky will turn to vinegar after

decades - or even centuries.'

'When looking at investment, the bottles should be limited

releases and, most importantly, top-notch for drinking,' adds

Sukhinder Singh from The Whisky Exchange. 'Another area ripe for

collecting is lost distilleries - these are getting scarcer by the day and

prices have already increased tremendously over the past few years.'

rare and expensive. It's also a pretty

special thing to have; there will

never be anything like it again. The

Lost Distilleries Blend #6

Cognacs, no drinks cabinet is

complete without vodka.

Grey Goose

If you want to invest in a series, check out

collaboration between three masters of their

craft: creative director Fabien Baron, Lalique

Lost Distilleries Blend #6

Under the hammer:

spirits to buy at auction

If you've still got money to burn after stocking up your drinks cabinet - or

if you fancy investing in the hard stuŸ - there's plenty of excitement to be

had at auction. A record number of collectable bottles of Scotch whisky were

sold at auction in the UK during 2014, according to whisky consultancy Rare

Whisky 101. The   rm says the number of single malts sold that year soared

by more than 68% to 33,998, resulting in a massive increase in the value of

collectable bottles, which now sits at £7.656m.

The Macallan recently scooped a Guinness World Record for the 'most

expensive whisky sold at auction'. The Macallan M Imperiale 6-litre Lalique

decanter sold at auction in Hong Kong for $628,000 (£411,000) in January

2014, breaking the previous record of $460,000, which had been held by The

Macallan 64-year-old in Lalique Cire Perdue decanter.

Lost Distilleries Blend #6

Rare Whisky 101 co-founder Andy Simpson oŸ ers words of wisdom when it

comes to whisky investment. 'Investing in whisky has certain advantages over

wine - it doesn't require the cool, cellar-like conditions that wines often demand.

Macallan 64-year-old in Lalique Cire Perdue decanter.

dried fruit to the fore.

in existence,

making the contents of

this hand-blown, engraved

decanter a top drop for your

collection of liquid assets. At 46.8%

abv, the 35-year-old has a full nose, with

Glengoyne's signature apple at its core.

The dram comes in a solid oak box with

Bottles must be stored upright but can be kept in almost any

environment. As a result, whisky can and should be kept

in pristine condition - its value can fall dramatically

in evaporation. Thankfully, however, unlike wine, there

is no evidence that whisky will turn to vinegar after

decades - or even centuries.'

'When looking at investment, the bottles should be limited

releases and, most importantly, top-notch for drinking,' adds

Sukhinder Singh from The Whisky Exchange. 'Another area ripe for

collecting is lost distilleries - these are getting scarcer by the day and

prices have already increased tremendously over the past few years.'

BUYING ANYTHING FROM A MOTHBALLED DISTILLERY

GUARANTEES IT'S GOING TO BE BOTH RARE AND EXPENSIVE.

IT'S A PRETTY SPECIAL THING TO HAVE

Index

  1. Page 0001
  2. Page 0002
  3. Page 0003
  4. Page 0004
  5. Page 0005
  6. Page 0006
  7. Page 0007
  8. Page 0008
  9. Page 0009
  10. Page 0010
  11. Page 0011
  12. Page 0012
  13. Page 0013
  14. Page 0014
  15. Page 0015
  16. Page 0016
  17. Page 0017
  18. Page 0018
  19. Page 0019
  20. Page 0020
  21. Page 0021
  22. Page 0022
  23. Page 0023
  24. Page 0024
  25. Page 0025
  26. Page 0026
  27. Page 0027
  28. Page 0028
  29. Page 0029
  30. Page 0030
  31. Page 0031
  32. Page 0032
  33. Page 0033
  34. Page 0034
  35. Page 0035
  36. Page 0036
  37. Page 0037
  38. Page 0038
  39. Page 0039
  40. Page 0040
  41. Page 0041
  42. Page 0042
  43. Page 0043
  44. Page 0044
  45. Page 0045
  46. Page 0046
  47. Page 0047
  48. Page 0048
  49. Page 0049
  50. Page 0050
  51. Page 0051
  52. Page 0052
  53. Page 0053
  54. Page 0054
  55. Page 0055
  56. Page 0056
  57. Page 0057
  58. Page 0058
  59. Page 0059
  60. Page 0060
  61. Page 0061
  62. Page 0062
  63. Page 0063
  64. Page 0064
  65. Page 0065
  66. Page 0066
  67. Page 0067
  68. Page 0068
  69. Page 0069
  70. Page 0070
  71. Page 0071
  72. Page 0072
  73. Page 0073
  74. Page 0074
  75. Page 0075
  76. Page 0076
  77. Page 0077
  78. Page 0078
  79. Page 0079
  80. Page 0080
  81. Page 0081
  82. Page 0082
  83. Page 0083
  84. Page 0084
  85. Page 0085
  86. Page 0086
  87. Page 0087
  88. Page 0088
  89. Page 0089
  90. Page 0090
  91. Page 0091
  92. Page 0092
  93. Page 0093
  94. Page 0094
  95. Page 0095
  96. Page 0096
  97. Page 0097
  98. Page 0098
  99. Page 0099
  100. Page 0100
  101. Page 0101
  102. Page 0102
  103. Page 0103
  104. Page 0104
  105. Page 0105
  106. Page 0106
  107. Page 0107
  108. Page 0108
  109. Page 0109
  110. Page 0110
  111. Page 0111
  112. Page 0112
  113. Page 0113
  114. Page 0114
  115. Page 0115
  116. Page 0116
  117. Page 0117
  118. Page 0118
  119. Page 0119
  120. Page 0120
  121. Page 0121
  122. Page 0122
  123. Page 0123
  124. Page 0124
  125. Page 0125
  126. Page 0126
  127. Page 0127
  128. Page 0128
  129. Page 0129
  130. Page 0130
  131. Page 0131
  132. Page 0132
  133. Page 0133
  134. Page 0134
  135. Page 0135
  136. Page 0136
  137. Page 0137
  138. Page 0138
  139. Page 0139
  140. Page 0140
  141. Page 0141
  142. Page 0142
  143. Page 0143
  144. Page 0144
  145. Page 0145
  146. Page 0146
  147. Page 0147
  148. Page 0148
  149. Page 0149
  150. Page 0150
  151. Page 0151
  152. Page 0152
  153. Page 0153
  154. Page 0154
  155. Page 0155
  156. Page 0156
  157. Page 0157
  158. Page 0158
  159. Page 0159
  160. Page 0160
  161. Page 0161
  162. Page 0162
  163. Page 0163
  164. Page 0164

Related Issues

powered by PageTiger