Page 0060

58 | squaremeal.co.uk

restaurants ‚ food

clouds may be as close as the hotel chain is

going to get to its namesake.

Different perspectives

Not wanting to get left behind in this roller

coaster, the City's original

skyscraper, Tower 42, has

turned to Jason Atherton

to revamp the dining room

located on its comparatively

lowly 24th ’oor. But height

isn't everything. As Atherton

puts it, being only halfway

up Tower 42 gives a dierent perspective.

'You will walk into my restaurant from the

lifts and immediately see the Gherkin, the

Cheesegrater, and all those iconic buildings

that have shot up in London over the past

decade, right in front of your eyes.'

And what's inside will be just as good.

When the restaurant opens in May, diners

will •nd an interior designed by Atherton's

frequent collaborator Russell Sage, who

was responsible for the look of Little

Social and Social Eating House. Here he's

Star billing goes to The Fenchurch Seafood

Bar ‚ Grill, which we've been told will 'exude

traditional charm' - quite a challenge given

that the restaurant will be 525ft above street

level. Responsibly caught seafood will feature

on the menu, alongside seasonal

game and British beef. Expect

the likes of seafood cocktail with

lobster followed by •llet steak

with marrowbone shallot sauce,

as well as afternoon tea.

Then there's the Darwin

Brasserie on the 36th ’oor,

which will serve classic European cuisine

based on seasonal ingredients: think beef

carpaccio, lemon sole with shrimp butter

or cod and chips. Not forgetting Bar 35 on

(you've guessed it) the 35th ’oor, which is

being billed as a contemporary wine and

food bar with an all-day menu, running

from breakfast to British tapas inspired by

Borough Market - a tiny speck on the other

side of the river when viewed from up here,

and a potent reminder of literally how far

the restaurant scene has come.

creating a sleek art deco mix of brass and

chrome, rosewood and smoked glass, as

if the Chrysler Building has come to the

Square Mile. Cocktails will also pay homage

to the Jazz Age, while the restaurant's focal

point will be a black and steel open kitchen

overseen by Paul Walsh, previously sous chef

at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay.

Then in October, Londoners will •nally

get the chance to access the summit of

20 Fenchurch Street, aka the Walkie Talkie,

which is proving to be just as divisive as

the Gherkin once was thanks to its bulging,

top-heavy shape. The top three ’oors will

be home to a viewing deck and sky gardens,

as well as three eating and drinking spaces,

operated by catering company Rhubarb.

The City's original skyscraper,

Tower 42, has turned to Jason

Atherton to revamp its dining room

The rocking Duck � Wa�e bar (left); the

stunning outdoor terrace at Sushisamba

Play spot St Paul's Cathedral from Hutong;

Square Meal reader favourite Oblix (right) The soon-to-open Ting in Shangri-La (left);

Brit-themed dining at Aqua Shard

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